The U.S. System for ‘Skilled’ Migrants Is Broken

The U.S. System for ‘Skilled’ Migrants Is Broken
Tamsyn Mahoney-Steel took a winding path to Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.She began by studying politics and philosophy in her native Britain, then trained as a singer, before getting a doctoral degree in medieval music and literature. Working with centuries-old French lyrics exposed her to systems that help digitally analyze manuscripts, poetry, and literature. In 2013, Mahoney-Steel was hired by Johns Hopkins to use technology to conduct research in medieval studies and to support other researchers, and arrived in the United States on a visa designed for skilled workers, the H-1B. She moved to Baltimore, met the man who would become her husband, and bought a house. All was well—until last year.Mahoney-Steel’s visa was up for renewal, a process that has traditionally been automatic, and Johns Hopkins gave her the impression that she had no reason to worry. Nine days before her visa was due to expire, however, authorities at… ..... Read More.
THE ATLANTIC – Politics | Politics & GovernmentFri, May 17, 2019
4 days ago
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